Components and Advance JSX

Use Multiline JSX in a Component

In this lesson, you will learn some common ways that JSX and React components work together. You’ll get more comfortable with both JSX and components, while picking up some new tricks.

Take a look at this HTML:

How might you make a React component that renders this HTML?

One way of doing it is wrapped them in parenthesis

Until now, your render function return statements have looked like this, without any parentheses:

However, a multi-line JSX expression should always be wrapped in parentheses!

Use a Variable Attribute in a Component

Take a look at this JavaScript object named redPanda:

How could you render a React component, and get a picture with redPanda‘s properties?

Select the code given below to see one way to do it.

Note all of the curly-brace JavaScript injections inside of the render function! Lines 16, 17, and 18 all use JavaScript injections.

You can, and often will, inject JavaScript into JSX inside of a render function.

import React from ‘react’;

import ReactDOM from ‘react-dom’;

const redPanda = {

src: ‘https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b2/Endangered_Red_Panda.jpg',

alt: ‘Red Panda’,

width: ‘200px’

};

class RedPanda extends React.Component {

render() {

return (

<div>

<h1>Cute Red Panda</h1>

<img

src={redPanda.src}

alt={redPanda.alt}

width={redPanda.width} />

</div>

);

}

}

ReactDOM.render(

<RedPanda />,

document.getElementById(‘app’)

);

Put Logic in a Render Function

A render() function must have a return statement. However, that isn’t all that it can have.

A render() function can also be a fine place to put simple calculations that need to happen right before a component renders. Here’s an example of some calculations inside of a render function:

Watch out for this common mistake:

In the above example, the line with the const n declaration will cause a syntax error, as is it should not be part of the class declaration itself, but should occur in a method like render().

See one more Example given Below to understand it better.

import React from ‘react’;

import ReactDOM from ‘react-dom’;

const friends = [

{

title: “Yummmmmmm”,

src: “https://s3.amazonaws.com/codecademy-content/courses/React/react_photo-monkeyweirdo.jpg"

},

{

title: “Hey Guys! Wait Up!”,

src: “https://s3.amazonaws.com/codecademy-content/courses/React/react_photo-earnestfrog.jpg"

},

{

title: “Yikes”,

src: “https://s3.amazonaws.com/codecademy-content/courses/React/react_photo-alpaca.jpg"

}

];

class Friend extends React.Component {

render() {

const friend = friends[1];

return (

<div>

<h1>{friend.title}</h1>

<img src={friend.src} />

</div>

);

}

}

ReactDOM.render(

<Friend />,

document.getElementById(‘app’)

);

Use a Conditional in a Render Function

How might you use a conditional statement inside of a render() function?

See the code given below to see one way of doing it.

Notice that the if statement is located inside of the render function, but before the return statement. This is pretty much the only way that you will ever see an if statement used in a render function.

Example-1

import React from ‘react’;

import ReactDOM from ‘react-dom’;

class TodaysPlan extends React.Component {

render() {

let task;

if (!apocalypse) {

task = ‘learn React.js’

} else {

task = ‘run around’

}

return <h1>Today I am going to {task}!</h1>;

}

}

ReactDOM.render(

<TodaysPlan />,

document.getElementById(‘app’)

);

EXample-2

import React from ‘react’;

import ReactDOM from ‘react-dom’;

const fiftyFifty = Math.random() < 0.5;

// New component class starts here:

class TonightsPlan extends React.Component {

render() {

if (fiftyFifty) {

return <h1>Tonight I’m going out WOOO</h1>;

} else {

return <h1>Tonight I’m going to bed WOOO</h1>;

}

}

}

ReactDOM.render(

<TonightsPlan />,

document.getElementById(‘app’)

);

Use this in a Component

The word this gets used in React a lot!

You are especially likely to see this inside of the body of a component class declaration. Here’s an example:

In the code, what does this mean?

Once you have a guess, scroll down to see the answer.

The simple answer is that this refers to an instance of IceCreamGuy. The less simple answer is that this refers to the object on which this‘s enclosing method, in this case .render(), is called. It is almost inevitable that this object will be an instance of IceCreamGuy, but technically it could be something else.

Let’s assume that this refers to an instance of your component class, as will be the case in all examples in this course. IceCreamGuy has two methods: .food and .render(). Since this will evaluate to an instance of IceCreamGuy, this.food will evaluate to a call of IceCreamGuy‘s .food method. This method will, in turn, evaluate to the string “ice cream.”

Why don’t you need parentheses after this.food? Shouldn’t it be this.food()?

You don’t need those parentheses because .food is a getter method. You can tell this from the get in the above class declaration body.

There’s nothing React-specific about getter methods, nor about this behaving in this way! However, in React you will see this used in this way almost constantly.

this in JavaScript can be a difficult concept! Here is a good resource for understanding this in JavaScript.

import React from ‘react’;

import ReactDOM from ‘react-dom’;

class MyName extends React.Component {

// name property goes here:

get name() {

return ‘whatever-your-name-is-goes-here’;

}

render() {

return (

<h1>

My name is {this.name}.

</h1>

);

}

}

ReactDOM.render(<MyName />, document.getElementById(‘app’));

Use an Event Listener in a Component

Render functions often contain event listeners. Here’s an example of an event listener in a render function:

Recall that an event handler is a function that gets called in response to an event. In the above example, the event handler is myFunc().

In React, you define event handlers as methods on a component class. Like this:

Notice that the component class has two methods: .myFunc() and .render(). .myFunc() is being used as an event handler. .myFunc() will be called any time that a user hovers over the rendered <div></div>.

import React from ‘react’;

import ReactDOM from ‘react-dom’;

class Button extends React.Component {

scream() {

alert(‘AAAAAAAAHHH!!!!!’);

}

render() {

return <button onClick={this.scream}>AAAAAH!</button>;

}

}

ReactDOM.render(

<Button />,

document.getElementById(‘app’)

);

Read Next — Component Rendering Another Component in React